Issue #19 |

It Could Be You!

by Eileen Coristine

Providing that it has never happened to you before, you could be the cover artist on the 10th Anniversary Issue of Art of the Peace magazine next spring.

Imagine the thrill:  Seeing your face and work on the cover of the magazine that showcases the best art in the Peace Region. Art of the Peace has a circulation of 1500 readers and is distributed throughout the Peace area and to galleries province wide.

There are many worthy and deserving artists in our region. Twice a year the Art of the Peace editorial committee meets to choose the artist for the cover of the next magazine. For our celebratory 10th Anniversary issue we’ve decided to leave that choice to a panel of experts. Three former cover artists will jury the Spring 2013 cover artist. The winning artist will be announced at the 10th Anniversary exhibition on April 11, 2013 at the Kin Gallery in Centre 2000, Grande Prairie.  The magazine will feature a four-page article dedicated to the chosen artist’s life and art – it could be yours!

Submissions are due by January 31, 2013, view the details for entering here.  There will be a selection of the winning artists work plus all submissions will be considered for exhibition in the Art of the Peace 10th Anniversary Exhibition.

Becoming a member of Art of the Peace is easy and includes many benefits. Find out more about membership or call Art of the Peace president Jim Stokes at 780 532 2573 for details.

If you are an art lover please tell your friends about this opportunity to grace the cover of our next magazine. If you are an artist, we hope you’ll join us in our quest to bring the best Peace Region art to our readers.


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Jobs, housing, schools, a decent infrastructure - no-one argues that these are essential ingredients to a community. But art as economic development? The topic can open up a heated debate. By serendipity, the common thread that runs through the articles in our second issue gives this question much food for thought.

Is it possible the little town of Chemainus, BC, would still be struggling to exist if it had not been for someone who believed in art. Now it thrives, its 33 murals drawing over 400,000 visitors a year. Dawson Creek may have lost its historic grain elevator had it not been converted to a vibrant art gallery. The new phase of the Grande Prairie Museum at Centre 2000 is brought to life, thanks to the talent of Tim Heimdal.

Repeated studies show that teaching art and music in schools creates more diverse and successful learners. No-one working at the Prairie Art Gallery would doubt that. The children who visit on the many school tours embrace art and become its best ambassadors.

Partnerships of diversity are the key to growth - whether artistic, or economic. Taking primary colours and creating rainbows; turning a flat, square building into a glorious waterfall; evolving rage into beauty; making a vision become a reality. This is the power of art.

Dymphny Dronyk Associate Editor


14 years ago

Jobs, housing, schools, a decent infrastructure - no-one argues that these are essential ingredients to a community. But art as economic development? The topic can open up a heated debate. By serendipity, the common thread that runs through the articles in our second issue gives this question much food for thought.

Is it possible the little town of Chemainus, BC, would still be struggling to exist if it had not been for someone who believed in art. Now it thrives, its 33 murals drawing over 400,000 visitors a year. Dawson Creek may have lost its historic grain elevator had it not been converted to a vibrant art gallery. The new phase of the Grande Prairie Museum at Centre 2000 is brought to life, thanks to the talent of Tim Heimdal.

Repeated studies show that teaching art and music in schools creates more diverse and successful learners. No-one working at the Prairie Art Gallery would doubt that. The children who visit on the many school tours embrace art and become its best ambassadors.

Partnerships of diversity are the key to growth - whether artistic, or economic. Taking primary colours and creating rainbows; turning a flat, square building into a glorious waterfall; evolving rage into beauty; making a vision become a reality. This is the power of art.

Dymphny Dronyk Associate Editor


14 years ago

Jobs, housing, schools, a decent infrastructure - no-one argues that these are essential ingredients to a community. But art as economic development? The topic can open up a heated debate. By serendipity, the common thread that runs through the articles in our second issue gives this question much food for thought.

Is it possible the little town of Chemainus, BC, would still be struggling to exist if it had not been for someone who believed in art. Now it thrives, its 33 murals drawing over 400,000 visitors a year. Dawson Creek may have lost its historic grain elevator had it not been converted to a vibrant art gallery. The new phase of the Grande Prairie Museum at Centre 2000 is brought to life, thanks to the talent of Tim Heimdal.

Repeated studies show that teaching art and music in schools creates more diverse and successful learners. No-one working at the Prairie Art Gallery would doubt that. The children who visit on the many school tours embrace art and become its best ambassadors.

Partnerships of diversity are the key to growth - whether artistic, or economic. Taking primary colours and creating rainbows; turning a flat, square building into a glorious waterfall; evolving rage into beauty; making a vision become a reality. This is the power of art.

Dymphny Dronyk Associate Editor


14 years ago