Three Soapstone Artists

Tapping into universal narratives

by Wendy Stefansson

Grant Berg

Grant Berg, Northern Lights, Soapstone Carving. Photo by Cheryl McCartney.

Grant Berg, Northern Lights, Soapstone Carving. Photo by Cheryl McCartney.

Prairie people are sky watchers. The concept of “landscape” here necessarily includes a vast and animated sky; a sky that’s a force to be reckoned with. In the work of Grande Prairie sculptor Grant Berg, this sky is a recurring motif.

His soapstone piece, There’s a Storm Movin’ In, depicts a big prairie thunderstorm rolling across the plains; the kind you know is going to hit you like the wrath of God. The sculpture curls in successive waves coalescing around a central void. Laced with marble-like veining, the stone itself gave Berg “lightning ripping across the storm front.”

In another work, Berg uses a pale green, translucent stone to depict rippling waves of northern lights. In a third, he has sculpted not a sky, but a bird; a phoenix. Berg struggled with this piece because it didn’t seem light enough to fly until he removed large amounts of stone from the wings, abstracting the bird to create a visual balance between strength and lightness.

Berg uses stone – dense, inert and earthbound – to represent air and flight. He feels compelled to, in his words, “carve the intangibles.”

Leslie Bjur

Leslie Bjur, The Argument, Soapstone Carving

Leslie Bjur, The Argument, Soapstone Carving

Grande Prairie artist Leslie Bjur talks to me about her recent soapstone sculpture, The Argument. It is solid stone rendered organic and fluid; its sinuous curves seem almost animate. Multiple tendrils strain in different directions, all trumpet-mouths and taut nerves. It reminds me of Yeats’ line, “Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold” – except that this is the moment just before disintegration, while the centre is still intact. While there is still hope for resolution. While dissolution is not yet inevitable. Bjur points out that there is a narrow part of the sculpture, so narrow that the stone comes close to breaking. It sticks out; has sharp edges. This piece is like the last verbal barb you aim as you are leaving the room.

Created at a time when a close friend was at odds with her partner and living with Bjur, The Argument expresses some of the intensity of that moment. That energy finds its way into the work. Bjur contends: “I don’t do pretty work. I do work that is organic,” growing naturally from life as it is lived.

“Living in this moment,” she says, “means making this piece right now.”

Rénald Lavoie

Rénald Lavoie, La voix de la mere, Soapstone Carving

Rénald Lavoie, La voix de la mere, Soapstone Carving

Inside Rénald Lavoie’s workshop at his farm outside of St. Isidore, he casually lifts a cloth off of a seemingly nondescript mass. What emerges surprisingly from beneath is La voix de la mère (The Voice of the Mother), a 28” tall sculpture he has carved in Brazilian soapstone. All roundness and encircling, the piece depicts a raven arcing upward along the spine of a mother engaged in an intimate conversation with the child in her lap. The figures seem to form a complete universe unto themselves; whole and self-contained.

This kind of uncomplicated humanity comes through in all of Lavoie’s work. Choosing the human form for its expressive possibilities, Lavoie is able to tap into universal narratives – beginnings and endings; intimacy, possibility, regret, grief and loss. One figure stands erect, her head cast down, her arm drawn protectively across her chest to her mouth. Another drops to the ground on all fours, sway-backed and stricken. Perhaps most poignantly, on a gravestone Lavoie carved for his brother, a figure in the fetal position emerges from – or returns to – the rough, uncarved mass of the stone.

Lavoie says simply: “We’re all part of this same rocky world.”


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It's a Living Thing

by Jody Farrell

[caption id="attachment_320" align="alignright" width="350" caption="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction"] http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction" width="350" height="212" /> [/caption]

Grande Prairie’s Montrose Cultural Centre, located on the site of the former Prairie Art Gallery (PAG), is scheduled to open this June. The modern and airy downtown building is home to both a new gallery and The Grande Prairie Public Library. The PAG will double the former exhibition space with its 8,000 square foot expansion, while the library will feature 37,400 square feet on two floors. The facade of the historic Central High School that housed the PAG since 1975, and was damaged when its roof collapsed in 2007, will form the cornerstone of the Montrose Cultural Centre. Its repair is due to be completed by 2011.

Since 1975, Grande Prairie’s only public art gallery has produced a wide range of both professional visual arts exhibitions and hands-on programs. In its unstuffy, people-friendly environment, it helped foster an appreciation of regional artists, as well as national and international ones whose works adorn galleries around the world.

Public galleries are perhaps society’s most recognizable “goto place” for a peek at what’s in store for our future. Everywhere, as has always been the case, visual arts reflect experiences and changes that we all experience, often even before they’re recognized by the world at large. Robert Steven, PAG Director-Curator, tells us some of what we can expect from our own Prairie Art Gallery during its first years in its new home.

“It’s hard to guess what the future holds,” Steven says when invited to imagine what the PAG will look like in the years to come. “We may be fooled. Right now though, I see the art world fully adjusting to the information age.”

http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="pag-construction2" width="245" height="205" /> Steven points to the everchanging world of online communication. While until recently, computers offered a “read only” experience, the latest internet sites including YouTube and Facebook make the actual sharing of information possible. These sites’ democratic approach, with content entirely produced by the public and not the programs’ creators, have radically changed the way we relate to our world. It’s an appealing feature for the PAG, which seeks to engage its users in genuine and open dialogue about the visual arts.

“The Prairie Art Gallery space was initially created for art discourse,” Steven says. “We are looking to expand that with a content-rich interactive format on a regional and international scale.” Under Steven’s guidance, the gallery will amass information and facilitate research and interaction with artists, allowing visitors to enjoy a wide range of experiences, including the chance to be a gallery curator. Visitors will be invited to locate art images on computer and project their personal favourites onto a wall. Steven envisions a virtual library that contains the latest in international and national arts news, along with live web-cameras showing what a regional artist is doing that very day. He sees the ongoing dialogue between gallery visitor and artist as essential in keeping Peace Region art relevant and alive.

In his earnest conviction that Grande Prairie and the Peace area is home to some of this country’s most interesting visual artists, Steven is determined to make the PAG “the best little art gallery in the world.”

His multi-faceted plan begins with acknowledging a major obstacle for any gallery: limited storage. The 8,000 square feet that will be added onto the existing PAG heritage building will feature new exhibition space for works on loan, but will only store so much donated or purchased art. What space the new gallery has will have to do for the next 20 years.

Digital space, on the other hand, provides nearly unlimited storage at very little cost. Steven’s “best little gallery in the world” plans include creating “Peace Works,” an event he describes as a “tangible juried exhibition” with a famous guest curator whose presence would bring international exposure to the gallery, while introducing its new patrons to the PAG’s soonto- be virtual library of regional artists.

“Even the discourse an international curator creates will drive us to do more on an international level,” Steven says. “We cannot bring our artists to the world if the world isn’t looking.”

His long-range vision involves creating a sustainable endowment program that enables the PAG to eliminate fees and fundraisers altogether, and focus primarily on becoming a world-class visual arts information centre. Steven also dreams of developing a province-wide professional association whose goal is to make Alberta itself the “best place in the world.”

“People want us to do what we do well. Our job is to determine what that is and do it to the very best of our ability.”

The Montrose Cultural Centre will feature the 4,200 square foot Central Hall, an open, warmly decorated public facility that will feature artwork and comfortable meeting spaces for community and private use. The Cultural Centre will be a stunning new addition to Grande Prairie, visible even at night, creating an inviting downtown go-to place for decades to come.


9 years ago

It's a Living Thing

by Jody Farrell

[caption id="attachment_320" align="alignright" width="350" caption="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction"] http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction" width="350" height="212" /> [/caption]

Grande Prairie’s Montrose Cultural Centre, located on the site of the former Prairie Art Gallery (PAG), is scheduled to open this June. The modern and airy downtown building is home to both a new gallery and The Grande Prairie Public Library. The PAG will double the former exhibition space with its 8,000 square foot expansion, while the library will feature 37,400 square feet on two floors. The facade of the historic Central High School that housed the PAG since 1975, and was damaged when its roof collapsed in 2007, will form the cornerstone of the Montrose Cultural Centre. Its repair is due to be completed by 2011.

Since 1975, Grande Prairie’s only public art gallery has produced a wide range of both professional visual arts exhibitions and hands-on programs. In its unstuffy, people-friendly environment, it helped foster an appreciation of regional artists, as well as national and international ones whose works adorn galleries around the world.

Public galleries are perhaps society’s most recognizable “goto place” for a peek at what’s in store for our future. Everywhere, as has always been the case, visual arts reflect experiences and changes that we all experience, often even before they’re recognized by the world at large. Robert Steven, PAG Director-Curator, tells us some of what we can expect from our own Prairie Art Gallery during its first years in its new home.

“It’s hard to guess what the future holds,” Steven says when invited to imagine what the PAG will look like in the years to come. “We may be fooled. Right now though, I see the art world fully adjusting to the information age.”

http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="pag-construction2" width="245" height="205" /> Steven points to the everchanging world of online communication. While until recently, computers offered a “read only” experience, the latest internet sites including YouTube and Facebook make the actual sharing of information possible. These sites’ democratic approach, with content entirely produced by the public and not the programs’ creators, have radically changed the way we relate to our world. It’s an appealing feature for the PAG, which seeks to engage its users in genuine and open dialogue about the visual arts.

“The Prairie Art Gallery space was initially created for art discourse,” Steven says. “We are looking to expand that with a content-rich interactive format on a regional and international scale.” Under Steven’s guidance, the gallery will amass information and facilitate research and interaction with artists, allowing visitors to enjoy a wide range of experiences, including the chance to be a gallery curator. Visitors will be invited to locate art images on computer and project their personal favourites onto a wall. Steven envisions a virtual library that contains the latest in international and national arts news, along with live web-cameras showing what a regional artist is doing that very day. He sees the ongoing dialogue between gallery visitor and artist as essential in keeping Peace Region art relevant and alive.

In his earnest conviction that Grande Prairie and the Peace area is home to some of this country’s most interesting visual artists, Steven is determined to make the PAG “the best little art gallery in the world.”

His multi-faceted plan begins with acknowledging a major obstacle for any gallery: limited storage. The 8,000 square feet that will be added onto the existing PAG heritage building will feature new exhibition space for works on loan, but will only store so much donated or purchased art. What space the new gallery has will have to do for the next 20 years.

Digital space, on the other hand, provides nearly unlimited storage at very little cost. Steven’s “best little gallery in the world” plans include creating “Peace Works,” an event he describes as a “tangible juried exhibition” with a famous guest curator whose presence would bring international exposure to the gallery, while introducing its new patrons to the PAG’s soonto- be virtual library of regional artists.

“Even the discourse an international curator creates will drive us to do more on an international level,” Steven says. “We cannot bring our artists to the world if the world isn’t looking.”

His long-range vision involves creating a sustainable endowment program that enables the PAG to eliminate fees and fundraisers altogether, and focus primarily on becoming a world-class visual arts information centre. Steven also dreams of developing a province-wide professional association whose goal is to make Alberta itself the “best place in the world.”

“People want us to do what we do well. Our job is to determine what that is and do it to the very best of our ability.”

The Montrose Cultural Centre will feature the 4,200 square foot Central Hall, an open, warmly decorated public facility that will feature artwork and comfortable meeting spaces for community and private use. The Cultural Centre will be a stunning new addition to Grande Prairie, visible even at night, creating an inviting downtown go-to place for decades to come.


9 years ago

It's a Living Thing

by Jody Farrell

[caption id="attachment_320" align="alignright" width="350" caption="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction"] http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="The Montrose Cultural Centre, the new home of the Prairie Art Gallery is in its final phase of construction" width="350" height="212" /> [/caption]

Grande Prairie’s Montrose Cultural Centre, located on the site of the former Prairie Art Gallery (PAG), is scheduled to open this June. The modern and airy downtown building is home to both a new gallery and The Grande Prairie Public Library. The PAG will double the former exhibition space with its 8,000 square foot expansion, while the library will feature 37,400 square feet on two floors. The facade of the historic Central High School that housed the PAG since 1975, and was damaged when its roof collapsed in 2007, will form the cornerstone of the Montrose Cultural Centre. Its repair is due to be completed by 2011.

Since 1975, Grande Prairie’s only public art gallery has produced a wide range of both professional visual arts exhibitions and hands-on programs. In its unstuffy, people-friendly environment, it helped foster an appreciation of regional artists, as well as national and international ones whose works adorn galleries around the world.

Public galleries are perhaps society’s most recognizable “goto place” for a peek at what’s in store for our future. Everywhere, as has always been the case, visual arts reflect experiences and changes that we all experience, often even before they’re recognized by the world at large. Robert Steven, PAG Director-Curator, tells us some of what we can expect from our own Prairie Art Gallery during its first years in its new home.

“It’s hard to guess what the future holds,” Steven says when invited to imagine what the PAG will look like in the years to come. “We may be fooled. Right now though, I see the art world fully adjusting to the information age.”

http://www.artofthepeace.ca/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/pag-construction-350x212.jpg" alt="pag-construction2" width="245" height="205" /> Steven points to the everchanging world of online communication. While until recently, computers offered a “read only” experience, the latest internet sites including YouTube and Facebook make the actual sharing of information possible. These sites’ democratic approach, with content entirely produced by the public and not the programs’ creators, have radically changed the way we relate to our world. It’s an appealing feature for the PAG, which seeks to engage its users in genuine and open dialogue about the visual arts.

“The Prairie Art Gallery space was initially created for art discourse,” Steven says. “We are looking to expand that with a content-rich interactive format on a regional and international scale.” Under Steven’s guidance, the gallery will amass information and facilitate research and interaction with artists, allowing visitors to enjoy a wide range of experiences, including the chance to be a gallery curator. Visitors will be invited to locate art images on computer and project their personal favourites onto a wall. Steven envisions a virtual library that contains the latest in international and national arts news, along with live web-cameras showing what a regional artist is doing that very day. He sees the ongoing dialogue between gallery visitor and artist as essential in keeping Peace Region art relevant and alive.

In his earnest conviction that Grande Prairie and the Peace area is home to some of this country’s most interesting visual artists, Steven is determined to make the PAG “the best little art gallery in the world.”

His multi-faceted plan begins with acknowledging a major obstacle for any gallery: limited storage. The 8,000 square feet that will be added onto the existing PAG heritage building will feature new exhibition space for works on loan, but will only store so much donated or purchased art. What space the new gallery has will have to do for the next 20 years.

Digital space, on the other hand, provides nearly unlimited storage at very little cost. Steven’s “best little gallery in the world” plans include creating “Peace Works,” an event he describes as a “tangible juried exhibition” with a famous guest curator whose presence would bring international exposure to the gallery, while introducing its new patrons to the PAG’s soonto- be virtual library of regional artists.

“Even the discourse an international curator creates will drive us to do more on an international level,” Steven says. “We cannot bring our artists to the world if the world isn’t looking.”

His long-range vision involves creating a sustainable endowment program that enables the PAG to eliminate fees and fundraisers altogether, and focus primarily on becoming a world-class visual arts information centre. Steven also dreams of developing a province-wide professional association whose goal is to make Alberta itself the “best place in the world.”

“People want us to do what we do well. Our job is to determine what that is and do it to the very best of our ability.”

The Montrose Cultural Centre will feature the 4,200 square foot Central Hall, an open, warmly decorated public facility that will feature artwork and comfortable meeting spaces for community and private use. The Cultural Centre will be a stunning new addition to Grande Prairie, visible even at night, creating an inviting downtown go-to place for decades to come.


9 years ago